#AfricanHistory: #Beyonce’s ‘Love Drought’ is based on #IgboLanding-a SLAVE REVOLT! [vid]

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Things not TAUGHT IN SCHOOL: Did you know that Beyonce’s MOVING visual for ‘Love Drought’ was based on the Igbo Landing Story?

The “Igbo Landing” story was an act of mass resistance against slavery. A group of slaves revolted, took control of their slave ship, grounded it on an island and rather than submit to slavery, proceeded to march into the water.

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Igbo Landing is a historic site at Dunbar Creek on St. Simons Island, Glynn County, Georgia. In 1803 one of the largest mass suicides of enslaved people took place when Igbo captives from what is now Nigeria were taken to the Georgia coast. In May 1803, the Igbo and other West African captives arrived in Savannah, Georgia, on the slave ship the Wanderer. They were purchased for an average of $100 each by slave merchants John Couper and Thomas Spalding to be resold to plantations on nearby St. Simons Island. The chained slaves were packed under deck of a coastal vessel, the York, which would take them to St. Simons. During the voyage, approximately 75 Igbo slaves rose in rebellion, took control of the ship, drowned their captors, and in the process caused the grounding of the ship in Dunbar Creek.

The sequence of events that occurred next remains unclear. It is known only that the Igbo marched ashore, singing, led by their high chief. Then at his direction, they walked into the marshy waters of Dunbar Creek, committing mass suicide. Roswell King, a white overseer on the nearby Pierce Butler plantation, wrote the first account of the incident. He and another man identified only as Captain Patterson recovered many of the drowned bodies. Apparently only a subset of the 75 Igbo rebels drowned. Thirteen bodies were recovered, but others remained missing, and some may have survived the suicide episode, making the actual numbers of deaths uncertain. [for more click HERE]

 

www.TheGamutt.com

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